Workforce Fairness Institute

WHAT HOSTESS WORKERS ARE SAYING ABOUT BIG LABOR’S JOB-KILLING AGENDA

Steve Fisher From Alaska Said Employees Had Nothing To Do With “The Union Or The Strike That Led To The Shutdown”:
 
“More Than 90 Employees – Some Of Whom Had Been With The Company For Decades – Were Told At 6 A.M. Friday That They Would Be Losing Their Jobs, Said Steve Fisher Of Alaska Teamsters Local 959.” (Michelle Theriault Boots, “Anchorage Bakery To Close As Part Of Hostess Shutdown,” Anchorage Daily News, 11/16/12)
 
“Fisher, The Teamsters Representative, Says Workers In Alaska Had Nothing To Do With The Union Or The Strike That Led To The Shutdown.  ‘None Of The People Up Here Went On Strike.  None Of The People Up Here Caused This To Happen.’  The Teamsters Union Had Voted To Accept Terms Offered By Hostess Because The Union ‘Realized The Concessions Weren't A Great Deal But If You Didn’t Accept Them The Company Would Go Under,’ He Said.” (Michelle Theriault Boots, “Anchorage Bakery To Close As Part Of Hostess Shutdown,” Anchorage Daily News, 11/16/12)
 
Jim Mabry From California Blamed The Bakers’ Union For Shut Down And Losing Job:
 
“In California, the closure affects 1,822 workers, including 19 employees in Irvine, 22 in Costa Mesa and 45 at the bakery outlet at 901 E. Orangethorpe Ave. in Anaheim.  Two plants in Los Angeles and others in Oakland and Sacramento also were shut down.  Jim Mabry, 59, a truck mechanic at the Anaheim bakery for 37 years, took a break Friday morning and reminisced about the decades working there.  ‘It’s just a mess,’ said Mabry, 59, shaking his head.  ‘Right now, I blame the bakers for holding out.  All they had to do was go back to work.  But instead, they decided to quit working – and take 18,000 of us down with them.’  Mabry started working at the Anaheim baker when he was 21.  ‘I was hoping to get in a few more years before retirement,’ he said.  ‘I guess I'll just have to collect unemployment for awhile instead.  I’ll be fine, I just feel bad for the younger guys.’”
(Lisa Liddane & Eric Carpenter, “Hostess Ends Production, Lays Off More Than 18,000,” Orange County Register, 11/17/12)
  

Luigi Peruzzi From Michigan Said Baker’s “Made A Terrible Choice Based Solely On Terrible Information”:

“‘I don’t really feel betrayed’ by the bakery workers, said Teamster Luigi Peruzzi, a Hostess driver in Detroit for 25 years. ‘I think they made a terrible choice based solely on terrible information from their leadership.’ The 48-year-old, who has worked continuously since he was 16, said he hoped a new owner would rehire him but was pessimistic. ‘Right now,’ he said, ‘I’m scared to death’ about supporting his family of five.”
(Rachel Feintzeig & Mike Spector, “Hostess Union Clings To Hope,” The Wall Street Journal, 11/18/12)

 
Joe Ryder From Pennsylvania Disagreed With Union Boss-Organized Strikes:
 
“Robert and Joe Ryder’s union, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, wrestled with the same question – and the two brothers, both leaders in the same Philadelphia-area local, took opposing points of view.  Joe Ryder, 55, a vice president at Local 463, agreed with the concessions, albeit reluctantly.  Robert Ryder, 54, head of the union, disagreed, saying it would hurt Teamsters at other bakeries.  As it turned out, the national union went Joe Ryder’s way, with Teamsters working at Hostess voting 53 percent to 47 percent to accept the cuts.  Local 463, which represents 130 drivers and others at Hostess’ Philadelphia plant, voted the same way.” (Jane M. Von Bergen, “Teamster Brothers Differ On Hostess Deal,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11/18/12)
  
“Even The Teamsters Who Had Voted Against The Concessions ‘Started To Understand That The Job They Had Was Better Than Any Other Job’ Available In Today’s Tough Economy.” (Jane M. Von Bergen, “Teamster Brothers Differ On Hostess Deal,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11/18/12)
 
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